Picasso in Seattle!

October 8, 2010 § Leave a comment

Here is a better reason than outlet shopping for braving the three-hour drive from Vancouver to Seattle: Picasso! Over 150 works by the Spanish master will be shown at the Seattle Art Museum starting today and going through January 17th. The range of works includes pieces from virtually every phase of Picasso’s legendary career and all medium he dabbed on: paintings, prints, drawings, photographs and sculptures.

This unprecedented opportunity is possible at this time because the Musée Picasso has recently closed for renovations, allowing a global tour of this full-scale survey to travel for the first and, probably, the only time. The Musée Picasso’s holdings stand apart from any other collections of Picasso because they represent the artist’s personal collection—works that the highly self-aware artist kept for himself with the intent of shaping his own artistic legacy.

This is the first major survey of the long and productive career of Pablo Picasso to ever be seen in the Northwest. The exhibition is curated by Anne Baldassari, General Curator of the exhibition and Chief Curator of Collections and Chairman of the Musée National Picasso, Paris.

Tickets are $23 for adults and can be bought online.

Kerry James Marshall at the VAG

September 11, 2010 § Leave a comment

The grandiose and touching exhibition of Kerry James Marshall at the VAG makes it to the pages of Art Forum. Kudos to Kathleen Bartels (and our Jeff Wall) for putting together one of the most beautiful exhibitions of the year so far and for her overall brilliant work as the head of the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Kerry James Marshall

VANCOUVER ART GALLERY
VANCOUVER
Through January 3 2011
Curated by Kathleen Bartels and Jeff Wall

Kerry James Marshall’s 1993 canvas De Style, a vibrant, large-scale, multifigure painting of an African-American barbershop, was a breakthrough for the artist and set the basic parameters of his ensuing practice. In the years since, he has updated the ostensibly moribund genre of history painting with an important corpus of visually complex narrative tableaux. For the Chicago-based painter’s first solo show in Canada, De Style will join some twenty more recent works, including examples from his iconic series “Garden Project,” 1995, which richly reimagines the representation of public housing projects.(read more)

Julian Schnabel at the AGO

September 1, 2010 § Leave a comment

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Julian Schnabel:  Asia, 2007 oil on map mounted on linen

Julian Schnabel: Art and Film

September 1, 2010 – January 2, 2011
Art Gallery of Ontario

American art superstar Julian Schnabel has spent his life pushing the limits of painting and crossing artistic boundaries as an award-winning filmmaker. Now, for the first time, a major retrospective examines the connections between painting and film in Schnabel’s work, tracing how his paintings exist in dialogue with the cinema and revealing the rich interplay between the two media. Julian Schnabel: Art and Film surveys Schnabel’s work as a painter from the mid-1970s to the present and features more than 25 key works. The exhibition will occupy the entire fifth floor of the Art Gallery of Ontario’s Vivian & David Campbell Centre for Contemporary Art.

Jessica Stockholder at the Palacio de Cristal

July 21, 2010 § Leave a comment

Born in Seattle and with an art degree from University of British Columbia, Jessica Stockholder has been exploring multi-media installations for many years. Now her work takes the Palacio de Cristal in Madrid courtesy of Museo Reina Sofia with an installation titled Peer Out to See. The work was planned for this bright space and includes several elements and many colours. I love the central column formed by shopping and waste baskets, bowls, and other objects made of plastic. Subtle and vibrant, this work reminds me of Frank Stella, Rauschenberg, Miró.
Familiar objects transformed with witty humour and a clever sense of colour.
Stockholder lives and works in New Haven and currently directs the undergraduate program in sculpture at Yale University.

Cartier-Bresson at West Vancouver Museum

July 7, 2010 § Leave a comment

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A rare exhibition of 25 plates of French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson runs at the West Vancouver Museum through August 28. The photographs were selected from the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Canada and date from the 1930s and 40s. Master of the Instant includes highlights of Cartier-Bresson’s work like the widely recognizable Behind Gare St. Lazare that for me defines his quote about the decisive moment: the puddle-jumper is caught in mid-air while his image is reflected in the water below. His ability to capture a crucial moment has many more examples throughout his extensive body of work.

There is nothing in this world that does not have a decisive moment.

Cartier-Bresson, quoting 17th-century Cardinal de Retz on the preface of his 1952 book The Decisive Moment.

The Cheaper Show No9 Preview

June 24, 2010 § 3 Comments

I just got back from the preview of The Cheaper Show No9. Exciting stuff! Over 400 works from 200 artists will be sold for $200 each this Saturday. The preview attracted artists and supporters to the W2 Storyeum, a very comfortably sized venue that will accommodate the expected 3,000 people on the day of the show. Last year 1,770 art lovers lined up to get in the exhibition. Tonight I could see people taking notes hoping to fetch the best works in a couple of days. Rumour has it that some collectors pay good bucks to have someone standing in line for them.

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The Cheaper Show 2010

June 19, 2010 § 1 Comment

Cheaper 8 - The Art-Buying Crowd

Cheaper than a One Night Stand was started in 2001 by Vancouver-based artists Graeme Berglund, Steve “Breadman” Cole and Syx Langeman (known then as the collective Fracture Industries) as a new format to promote talented and underexposed artists. The concept was very simple: to have a one night art show with dozens of artists and with over a hundred pieces of art, all for sale at one affordable price.

On June 26th, The Cheaper Show No. 9 will have 200 artists (chosen from the original 950 submissions) and 400 pieces of work – all selling for $200 per piece. The new space is twice the size as last year’s,  now at W2 151 West Cordova Street. The show became so big and relevant that Mayor Gregor Robertson is going to declare June 26th The Cheaper Show Day for the city of Vancouver.

Just on a side note, last year the line had 1770 people when the doors opened at 7pm. So plan your strategy carefully.

I will be at the preview on the 24th and hopefully get some good shots for the readers of the Art Monitor. Stay tuned.

Canadian Artists featured in “Haunted” at the Guggenheim

June 16, 2010 § 1 Comment


Sarah Anne Johnson’s Morning Meeting, 2003 – Photo: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Canadian artists Jeff Wall, Stan Douglas, Luis Jacob and Sarah Anne Johnson are included in Haunted, a large exhibition of video, installation and photographic imagery exploring themes of memory, trauma, and return to the past. The show can be seen at the Guggenheim Museum in New York to September 6. These contemporary obsessions are also shown in works by Marina Abramović, Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman and Andy Warhol among many others.


Sarah Anne Johnson, installation work, Ms. Johnson’s “Chris and Cian”

Pop Life Hits Canada

June 10, 2010 § 2 Comments

Takashi Murakami  <i>VISVIM KEIFER Hi-Suede Multi Flower</i> 2008  © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co Ltd /  photo Masaki Sato
Takashi Murakami VISVIM KEIFER Hi-Suede Multi Flower 2008
photo Masaki Sato

Back in the Fall I was excited about this show at the Tate and now it’ s a few miles closer. The National Gallery of Canada brings to Ottawa “Pop Life – Art in a Material World” with its more than 250 art works from the likes of Keith Haring, Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst,
Tracey Emin, Martin Kippenberger, Maurizio Cattelan and Takashi Murakami. Canadian Art has the story.

Andy Warhol  <i>Mick Jagger</i> 1975 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts/ARS/SODRAC /  photo Tate Photography
Andy Warhol Mick Jagger 1975
photo Tate Photography

The Modern Woman at Vancouver Art Gallery

May 29, 2010 § 2 Comments

Edgar Degas, Standing Nude with Left Leg Raised,
Foot Resting on a Base, 1882-85
charcoal and pastel, squared, on blue vellum

The first drawing exhibition ever to travel from the Musée d’Orsay will bring works from the world’s finest collection of 19th-century French art to the Vancouver Art Gallery starting June 5. Presented are nearly 100 works by French artists such as  Degas, Gauguin, Manet, Pissaro, Renoir, Rodin, Toulouse-Lautrec, Seurat and others.  That’s an unique opportunity to see this amazing collection of works without hoping on a plane.

“What came together when selecting these drawings with Isabelle Julia (curator of the show) was how intimately and vividly the artists captured the complexity of the Belle Époque and the women who inhabited it,” said Thomas Padon, one of the exhibition’s three commissioners.

The exhibition hits town in time for Drawn, Vancouver’s drawing festival that opens its vast schedule of events July 17.

Camille Pissarro – Group of Bathers at Water’s Edge, 1894-96
gouache and pencil on silk with paper backing

Georges Seurat, The Black Bow, ca 1882, Conté crayon on paper

Edouard Manet, Portrait of Nina Villard (Madame Callias), 1873-74
gouache heightened with leadpoint on wood

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